Artist/Designer/Fashion


Beyond Type 1 Express Yourself Art Basel Winners

A Valentine to Fierce Fashion

At The Valentine's Costume and Textile Mini-Symposium, local artist Mo Regulinski shared the process of her latest series, “Regalia: Healing Avatars.”

by Megan Parry

November 25, 2015


A couple of weeks ago, I spent my Friday afternoon at The Valentine for their Costume and Textile Collection Mini-Symposium— a total treat for a fashion and art history nerd like myself. There were three speakers: FIT’s Associate Curator Colleen Hill spoke about the school’s upcoming Fairy Tale Fashion exhibition; Caroline Rennolds Milbank took the audience through a tour of fashion’s past in her talk “what we romanticize when we romanticize the past”; and local artist Mo Regulinski shared the process of her latest series, “Regalia: Healing Avatars.”





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https://beyondtype1.org/beyond-basel-art-exhibition/


On Saturday, December 3, 2016, Beyond Type 1 and the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation hosted “Beyond Basel” a cocktail party and art exhibition during Art Basel Miami 2016.

The evening brought together 250 members of the Beyond Type 1 and the DRIF communities, featuring works by artists living with Type 1: Appleton (known for his Diabetes-inspired street art featuring needles and insulin bottles), Natalie Irish (famed for painting with her lips on canvas) and tattoo artist Darren Brass (of Miami Ink fame). The winners of our “Express Yourself” Art Contest (Michael Natter, Josh Cooper, Camilla Jacobs and Maureen “Mo” Regulinski) were also on display.

Clothing designer uses medical supplies as fashion, inspiration for diabetes education

Mo Regulinski speaks at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU’s Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism about diabetes education.
Leha Byrd/University Public Affairs


By Leha Byrd
University Public Affairs
804-828-7028
llbyrd@vcu.edu


Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016


Mo Regulinski’s clothing designs are eclectic, to say the least.  

A frilly, halter style, knee-length dress called “Perspective” adorns 300 insulin pump infusion sets tightly woven onto shiny, lime green fabric. Another she calls “Wings” is a white, orange and blue shawl, bejeweled with 500 syringes and 10,000 glucose test strips...

VCU NEWS

Wednesday January 20, 2016